• ☆ Yσɠƚԋσʂ ☆@lemmy.mlOP
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      1 month ago

      Given that US can’t even win a war against Yemen, it’s pretty clear that burger empire has no business trying to take on China. Not to mention that US has lost every one of their own simulated conflicts in South China sea. Of course, we all know that burgerlanders lack the intelligence and wisdom to learn from their debacles, and will cheerfully rush into a war in China.

      • pingveno@lemmy.ml
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        1 month ago

        The simulated conflicts are run against an adversary that is perfect. No logistic errors, no maintenance issues, no communication issues, no human error. They are a teaching tool, not a crystal ball. In reality, in the event of a conflict there are plenty of areas where China would struggle.

        • ☆ Yσɠƚԋσʂ ☆@lemmy.mlOP
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          1 month ago

          And of course none of these problems would apply to burger empire who would have to attack China from across the ocean requiring far more complex supply chains. I mean just look how well burgerlander proxy war against Russia is going.

          • pingveno@lemmy.ml
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            1 month ago

            Those problems would absolutely apply. And moving equipment has never been a problem in Ukraine, it has been getting permission from a fickle Congress and training Ukrainian with gear they are not familiar with.

            • ☆ Yσɠƚԋσʂ ☆@lemmy.mlOP
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              1 month ago

              Moving equipment across complex supply lines has absolutely been a problem, and many commentators have talks about how much more difficult it is for US to ship weapons to Ukraine than for Russia. This should be obvious, yet here we are.

      • blackberry@lemmy.ml
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        1 month ago

        On the contrary, I believe that burgerlanders are well aware of the disparity. The United States will not engage China in direct military conflict. Within Chinese circles, there is a broader perception that the U.S. military understands China best when it comes to handling issues related to China. I feel the U.S. military is somewhat cautious on matters concerning China, often appearing to perform for public opinion, fulfilling a duty. China itself is inclined not to engage in military confrontation with the United States (while always prepared to defend against U.S. military attacks), and military exchanges will continue to exist. China hopes either to force U.S. military intervention directly in the Middle East or Ukraine or to expose the U.S. through repeated instances of providing security, directly confronting the United States and revealing that the security it provides is mere empty promises, as seen with the Philippines. Through such actions, China aims to dismantle the myth of U.S. “security guarantees” solidified by the military-backed U.S. dollar hegemony, dealing it a severe blow.

        • PolandIsAStateOfMind@lemmy.ml
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          1 month ago

          Through such actions, China aims to dismantle the myth of U.S. “security guarantees” solidified by the military-backed U.S. dollar hegemony, dealing it a severe blow.

          Now that’s a task. Myth of US security guarantees is dismantled visibly ever since Vietnam and has been repeatedly dismantled again and again ever since, but there still are governments that believe it. Or are comprador enough to do it anyway (i strongly suspect it is the latter, no one can be this dumb).

        • ☆ Yσɠƚԋσʂ ☆@lemmy.mlOP
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          1 month ago

          I do hope you’re right because a direct conflict between US and China would be cataclysmic for the whole world. I also agree that US military likely understands that this wouldn’t end well for them, but it seems that the political class in US is completely unhinged. There’s also little sign that their puppets administering the island learned all the wrong lessons going by these statements https://inews.co.uk/news/world/taiwan-learning-ukraine-china-attack-3122942

          I do think China will try to avoid a military confrontation, but there are red lines like putting missiles in Taiwan that would force China to act.

          • blackberry@lemmy.ml
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            1 month ago

            I believe that in the United States, the relationship between the military and politicians is more of a balancing act rather than absolute subordination. For instance, during the transition between the Trump and Biden administrations, representatives of the U.S. military independently assured China that they would not launch nuclear weapons against China and would inform China of Trump’s military decisions. Such actions would be considered inconceivable in China, as it essentially means the military is operating outside the president’s control (Trump was still president at the time).

            In ancient China, there was an event known as “Huang Pao Jia Shen” (Yellow Robe Incident), which highlighted the consequences of the military’s actual controller and the nominal controller being different individuals. Similar to the helicopters used for government investigations of military audits that always seem to “crash accidentally,” only to result in no conclusive outcomes, I think the U.S. military can be seen as akin to the “Fanzhen” or “Jiedushi” (regional military governors) of the Tang Dynasty in China. If politicians were to order the U.S. military to fight an unwinnable war, we might witness the military disobeying orders and the politicians “accidentally” meeting their demise.

            China plans to complete the construction of a cross-sea bridge to Taiwan by 2035, and I believe the reunification of China could happen in the next few years. Due to the “de-Sinicization education” in Taiwan, the younger generation no longer sees themselves as Chinese. On Chinese domestic social media, the viewpoint of “retaining the island without retaining the people” has significant traction (mostly said in moments of anger). I believe the CPC (Communist Party of China) will not make Taiwan the main battleground. Instead, they might encircle but not attack.If the U.S. intervenes, they could attack U.S. assets in the first island chain, forcing the U.S. out of the Asia-Pacific region. If the U.S. does not intervene, it would essentially signal the collapse of the myth of U.S. military guarantees. This would shatter Taiwan’s illusions about the U.S., leading Taiwan to undergo a self-revolution and eventually join China.

            • ☆ Yσɠƚԋσʂ ☆@lemmy.mlOP
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              1 month ago

              I do think that US military is far more sober than US politicians, so let’s hope that they really have some leverage within the system and can put their foot down when push comes to shove. Otherwise, we’re very likely headed for a nuclear holocaust.

      • filoria@lemmy.ml
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        1 month ago

        The other perspective is that defence is much easier in the information era. If the US couldn’t win against Yemen, what makes you think China could win against Taiwan?

        • ☆ Yσɠƚԋσʂ ☆@lemmy.mlOP
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          1 month ago

          You just have to look at a map to understand that. For starters, Taiwan imports over 90% of its energy. China just needs to blockade trade for Taiwan and the economy there will collapse overnight. Taiwan being an island makes it much harder to US to assist it as well, and US would be acting as the attacker in this scenario because China can launch missiles from the mainland just the same way Yemen does, while US would be forced to move assets from far away.